Taya Vais & Jeremie Nassif - Russia Visiting Paris

Photographer:@jeremie_nassifJeremie Nassif
Model:@taya_vaisTaya Vais

During the 19th century in France the “boudoir” used to be a room where women could gather together and talk freely without men hearing them. Boudoir photography should be a place where women can express their femininity with no restriction, this implies a respectful behavior as well as great complicity from the photographer.

People always ask me what is my technique to obtain the render of my pictures. I use a long exposure with ash, the blur part of the image is not created in post production but during shooting. It looks natural because the movements actually happened from the model, the camera or both.

When I shoot I try to create in my studio a freedom space for the model. A place that does not exist in real life. It’s just a dream that vanishes at the end of the shooting when we both wake up.

I do not explain what should be understood watching my pictures because i want to let flow the imagination of the viewer just like I let mine when I watch expositions. It is better not to know about the life of the model or the photographer to really be able to watch pictures without interference. This way the viewer can project his own pictorial culture and create his own meaning.

-- Jeremie Nassif

Taya Vais & Jeremie Nassif - Russia Visiting Paris

Photographer:@jeremie_nassifJeremie Nassif
Model:@taya_vaisTaya Vais

During the 19th century in France the “boudoir” used to be a room where women could gather together and talk freely without men hearing them. Boudoir photography should be a place where women can express their femininity with no restriction, this implies a respectful behavior as well as great complicity from the photographer.

People always ask me what is my technique to obtain the render of my pictures. I use a long exposure with ash, the blur part of the image is not created in post production but during shooting. It looks natural because the movements actually happened from the model, the camera or both.

When I shoot I try to create in my studio a freedom space for the model. A place that does not exist in real life. It’s just a dream that vanishes at the end of the shooting when we both wake up.

I do not explain what should be understood watching my pictures because i want to let flow the imagination of the viewer just like I let mine when I watch expositions. It is better not to know about the life of the model or the photographer to really be able to watch pictures without interference. This way the viewer can project his own pictorial culture and create his own meaning.

-- Jeremie Nassif